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  • Images
    The Liberty Head Nickels series includes a total of 33 different issues, not including the extremely rare 1913 nickel. These coins were struck at the Philadelphia Mint with the exception of the Denver and San Francisco minted pieces from 1912.
  • Mintages
    Coin mintage figures for the Liberty Head Nickel from 1883 to 1912. This includes coins struck for circulation as well as the proof versions struck for collectors.

  • Store Pages
  • 1883
    The first year of issue for the Liberty Nickel series comes in two varieties. The reverse design originally carried only a large Roman Numeral "V" to denote the value. After some gold plated nickels were passed off as $5 gold pieces, the word "CENTS" was
  • 1884
    The 1884 Liberty Nickel was the second year of the series. This issue had a mintage of 11,270,000 strikes for circulation. The design of the coin is by Charles E. Barber and carried the head of Liberty on the obverse and a large Roman Numeral "V".
  • 1885
    The key date coin of the series is the 1885 Liberty Nickel. Although this coin does not have the lowest mintage of the series at 1,472,700, it is the rarest in terms of surviving coins. Premiums exist at all grade levels from well circulation to gem.
  • 1886
    The 1886 Liberty Nickel had a mintage of 3,326,000, representing the third lowest of the series. This issue drives a premium at all grade levels and is considered a semi-key date of the series. The Philadelphia Mint also strike proof versions, which sell
  • 1887
    The 1887 Liberty Nickel was struck only at the Philadelphia Mint. For circulation, the production was 15,260,692, while the proof strikes were 2,960. Find a selection of 1887 Liberty Head Nickels available for sale below.
  • 1888
    The Liberty Head Nickel was struck in a composition of 75% copper and 25% nickel, and featured a design by Charles Barber. The 1888 Liberty Head Nickel is one of the better dates of the series with a mintage for circulation of 10,167,901.
  • 1889
    Featuring the head of Liberty on the obverse and a large Roman Numeral "V" on the reverse, the 1889 Liberty Nickel was struck at the Philadelphia Mint. Both circulation strikes and proof coins were minted.
  • 1890
    The Liberty Nickels of 1890 were struck entirely at the Philadelphia Mint. This had been the case for each year of the series so far. The circulation mintage reached 16,256,532 and the proof coin mintage was 2,740.
  • 1891
    The 1891 Liberty Head Nickel had a circulation mintage of 16,832,000 and proof coin mintage of 2,350. As with most other coins of the series, this issue remains relatively available in circulated grades, although becomes more difficult in uncirculated gra
  • 1892
    The Liberty Head Nickel was the second design for the five cent nickel denomination. It was designed by Charles Barber and ran from 1883 to 1912, until being replaced by the Buffalo Nickel.
  • 1893
    The 1893 Liberty Nickel was struck for circulation and in proof format at the Philadelphia Mint. As with most other issues of the series, mintages were relatively high resulting in availability of lower graded examples. Higher grades can be more difficult
  • 1894
    The 1894 Liberty Head Nickel was issued for circulation and in proof format. All coins were struck by the Philadelphia Mint. Below is a selection of PCGS and NGC certified coins available for sale.
  • 1895
    The 1895 Liberty Head Nickel had a mintage for circulation of 9,977,822. The Philadelphia Mint also struck proof coins for collectors with a mintage of 2,062. Below is a selection of coins available for sale.
  • 1896
    The Liberty Head Nickel series was issued from 1883 to 1912. The design followed the Shield Nickel, which was issued as the first design for the new nickel five cent denomination.
  • 1897
    The Liberty Nickel series continued its run, representing the second design for the five cent nickel denomination. In 1897, there were 20,426,797 coins struck for circulation at the Philadelphia Mint.
  • 1898
    More than a century old, the 1898 Liberty Nickel was struck at the Philadelphia Mint. There were 12,530,292 coins struck for circulation and an additional 1,795 pieces struck in proof format for collectors.
  • 1899
    The 1899 Liberty Nickel saw a jump in production to the highest level for the series so far. There were 26,027,000 coins struck for circulation at the Philadelphia Mint. This would eventually be eclipsed by even higher mintages in forthcoming years.
  • 1900
    The 1900 Liberty Head Nickel carries the allure of having a century mark date, making it an interesting conversation piece or keepsake. The coins were struck for circulation or in proof format in relatively high mintages.
  • 1901
    The Liberty Nickel was designed by Charles Barber and features the head of Liberty on the obverse, paired with a large Roman numeral "V" on the reverse. The 1901 nickel was struck for circulation and in proof format.
  • 1902
    The Philadelphia Mint handled production of the 1902 Liberty Head Nickel. At this time, smaller coinage of the one cent and five cent denomination was produced here, with branch mints contributing to the production of higher denominations.
  • 1903
    The 1903 Liberty Nickel had a mintage of just over 28 million coins for circulation and 1,790 proofs struck for collectors. This is a relatively common issue in lower circulated grades, however higher grades drive a premium.
  • 1904
    The Liberty Head Nickels of 1904 are another relatively common issue. Lower circulated grades can easily be acquired for a few dollars, however, higher grades will drive a premium.
  • 1905
    The 1905 Liberty Nickel was produced at the Philadelphia Mint. There were 29,825,124 coins struck for circulation and an additional 2,152 proof coins struck for collectors.
  • 1906
    The 1906 Liberty Head Nickel has one of the highest reported mintages of the series at more than 38 million pieces. These coins were struck for circulation at the Philadelphia Mint with an additional small number of proofs coined for collectors.
  • 1907
    Another high mintage year for the series of Liberty Nickels occurred in 1907. The Philadelphia Mint would produce 39,213,325 coins for circulation and another 1,475 coins in proof format for collectors.
  • 1908
    After several years of higher production, the 1908 Liberty Nickel saw 22,684,557 coins struck for circulation at the Philadelphia Mint. An even smaller mintage would take place in the following year.
  • 1909
    The mintage for the 1909 Liberty Nickel dropped to just 11,585,763 pieces. Within the overall series, this is not a particularly low figure, but it followed many years of elevated mintages. Sales of proof coins to collectors saw a boost to 4,763.
  • 1910
    Find a broad selection of 1910 Liberty Head Nickels available for sale. This includes raw examples in circulated grades, as well as higher mint state and proof examples encapsulated and graded by PCGS or NGC.
  • 1911
    As was typical for the denomination, the 1911 Liberty Nickel was struck for circulation at the Philadelphia Mint. The mintage was the highest of the series at 39,557,639. An additional 1,733 proof coin were struck for collectors.
  • 1912
    The 1912 Liberty Nickel was the last regular issue for the series, before it was replaced by the Buffalo Nickel. Of note, the coins were struck for circulation this year at the Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco Mints. This was the first time the fiv
  • CAC Liberty Head Nickels
    The coins appearing below have been graded by either PCGS or NGC and received a green sticker of approval from the Certified Acceptance Corporation (CAC). The sticker signifies that the coin has met CAC's grading standards and is solid or premium for the
  • Proof Liberty Head Nickels
    The United States Mint at Philadelphia struck proof versions of the Liberty Head Nickel for each year of issue. Although these coins have significantly lower mintages than the circulation strikes, most issues remain relatively affordable.